What we are cooking this week

What we are cooking this week

Some of you asked for drunken chicken and we heard you; it’s on the menu this week. But it takes a good few days to marinate it to get it properly “drunken”, so you must let me know by tomorrow morning IF you want it. For the rest of the menu, please email or text your order to me by end of Tuesday. Pick up is on Thursday from 12:30pm at 13 Montagu Place, W1H 2ET. Pork Sheng Jian Bao 鲜肉生煎 – £11 for a box of 5 cooked or a box of 6 frozen Drunken Chicken 醉鸡 – £15。 I use bone-in corn-fed chicken thighs. Must be ordered by Monday morning the 11th.  Steamed eggplants 凉拌落苏 – £11. It’s a cold dish you eat at room temperature and is light and refreshing. Soy beans & pickled garlic mustard 雪菜毛豆 – £11. The pickled mustard leaves used here is foraged near London and made by a friend of ours. It tastes just like the Xuecai mustard we have in Shanghai. Large wonton with a sesame dressing 麻酱菜肉大馄饨 – £11 for a box of 6. These large tortellini like wontons are stuffed with minced pork and chopped green pak choi This is also the last week we are making Zongzi 粽子 this year. Please get your orders in by Friday otherwise we cannot guarantee we will be able to make them for you.  There are 2 flavors: pork belly 肉粽 is £4 each and red beans 赤豆粽 is £3.5...
Zongzi Takeaway

Zongzi Takeaway

In Chinese culture, we make a lot of foods specifically as temple or ancestral offerings. I suspect they are all excuses to eat something that otherwise would be considered a luxury in an everyday diet. At Shanghai Supper Club we certainly love following these traditions as they are a perfect way to try different foods across different seasons. So for the upcoming Dragon Boat Festival on 18th June, we will be offering Zongzi for takeaway for the next few weeks. There are 2 flavours: pork belly at £4 each and red beans at £3.50 each. Minimum order is 4 pieces. They are available from Monday 21 May through Monday 18 June. Please place your order at least 24 hours in advance, as we make them fresh daily in the morning.  Pick-up is from W1H 2ET. Delivery can be arranged with a fee.  Please email us for a...
Cooking Lesson – 8 June

Cooking Lesson – 8 June

What you will make: Braised chicken and chestnuts Blanched spinach and tofu salad Pork and green pak choi wonton What you will learn: The Chinese seasonings and their usage Basic knife skills Making the stuffing and wrapping the perfect wonton Braising techniques When and where: Wednesday 8 June, 11:00 – 14:00 in Marylebone Ticket price: £60 per person including lunch, Chinese tea and leftovers to take home Class information:  A small group of 6 people As hands-on (or off) as you like. You can make everything from start to finish or watch and sip tea while we show you how it is done. To book, please email...
How to cook frozen Sheng Jian

How to cook frozen Sheng Jian

Here is a link to cooking Sheng Jian straight from the freezer. For fresh ones, it’s the same process but you can use less water and shorter cooking time. Tips: Use the smallest non-stick pan that will fit. Add the sesame and spring onion after the baos have been steamed for a few minutes so they stick to the top. It took 10 minuts from adding water to get a nice crispy bottom in this batch. If there’s still water left at the end, open the lid to dry it out. It’s important to cook till you hear sizzling and there’s no visible water left in the pan. This makes the bottom...
Happy New Year of the Monkey!

Happy New Year of the Monkey!

What are you doing to celebrate? Need a few ideas for London, New York and beyond? Check out the Telegraph’s guide for what’s happening in ten Chinese communities around the world. If you are in London, also make sure to check out The Magical Lantern Festival, a dazzling extravaganza of lights, music theatre, culture and art that runs to 6 March at Chiswick House in west London. We are going on the 22nd Feb, come join us! Want to learn a few New Year’s greetings? Here are some useful phrases and an audio guide on how to pronounce them. And most importantly, where to eat?  Here are some ideas to get you exploring: Shikumen in Shepherd’s Bush for dim sum and Peking Duck Tian Fu Bu Yi in Shepherd’s Bush for Sichuan cuisine including a ma-la hotpot Royal China and Royal China Club on Baker Street for Cantonese Bright Courtyard on Baker Street for a mix of regional Chinese including some Shanghainese dishes Local Friends in Golder’s Green for authentic Hunan cuisine; be careful to avoid 90% of the menu which is standard Cantonese and Anglo-Chinese food. Xi’an Impression for noodles and street food from Xi’an Gold Mine or Four Seasons for their roast meats. If you know of a good Chinese place, why now leave us a comment?...
Suzhou Style Pork Mooncake Recipe 鲜肉月饼

Suzhou Style Pork Mooncake Recipe 鲜肉月饼

It’s the Mid-Autumn festival this coming Sunday, and we have been busy perfecting the recipe for the Suzhou style meat-filled mooncakes that are popular in Shanghai. This seasonal treat has a rock-star status in the Shanghai street food scene; people would queue for up to 12 hours just to get their hands on them and have to fight off scalpers for spaces in the queue. Here is what the scene looks like. Suzhou mooncakes have a distinctly flaky pastry which is very different to the Cantonese style mooncakes that are prevalent here in the UK.  The stuffings can be savoury, sweet or a combo of both. The most famous and popular version is this pork-filled Xian Rou Yue Bing 鲜肉月饼。 Here is what you need to make 8 mooncakes. For the water dough: 100 g flour 30 g butter or lard 50 g warm water 5 g sugar 5 g salt Mix all the ingredients well until they are combined. The warm water helps to soften the butter/lard, so you don’t need to leave it at room temperature to soften. The dough feels sticky like bread dough, so you can throw it a few times onto the work surface to help work up the gluten. It helps the dough to be elastic and allows it to be repeatedly folded and rolled out without breaking apart. Wrap the worked dough in cling film and set aside for 30 minutes. For the oil dough: 100g flour 50g butter or lard, at room temperature Mix the flour and butter/lard well and wrap in cling film for 30 minutes For the stuffing: 200 g minced pork 1...
A take-out menu to celebrate turning 1!!

A take-out menu to celebrate turning 1!!

It was a year go this week I was sitting in my kitchen trying to hatch a perfect plan to start a new career doing something I’m passionate about – food! – while still giving me the flexibility to be a full-time mom when the kids get home.  A friend said to me:”Just cook something, and invite a few friends around. We will tell you honestly whether there is a market for Shanghai homecooking.”  So, I threw away the pen and paper, and picked up my knife and chopping board and started cooking. At the end of that lunch a week later, Shanghai Supper Club was born!! They gave me my first take-out orders based on that menu. So, to celebrate that life-changing lunch and a year of happy cooking, we are bringing you some of the favourites from last year’s take-out menus.   MENU Pork and Chinese cabbage pan-fried dumplings 白菜猪肉锅贴 with our homemade wrapper – 10 for £12 Braised pork belly 红烧肉 in a dark and treacly soy sauce. – £15 Spinach & tofu salad 马兰头 (v) with blanched and finely chopped spinach and tofu – £10 Steamed aubergines 清蒸茄子(v) Steaming makes the aubergines melt-in-your-mouth soft.  – £10 Stir-fried rice cake 炒年糕 (v) with Shiitake mushroom, Chinese cabbage and chicken slivers – £12 Onion oil noodles with dried shrimp 开洋葱油面 (v) This is the Chinese version of pasta aglio e olio. It looks simple but is full of flavours – £8 * (v) indicate dishes that are vegetarian or can be made as vegetarian. Serving suggestions: For a complete meal for 3-4 people, start with the dumplings, and follow with one vegetarian and one meat dish accompanied by the rice cake or the noodles....
The easiest dumpling to make

The easiest dumpling to make

For the second installment of our cooking lessons, we will be teaching you how to make the easiest dumplings there is: the Wonton. What you will make: Green pak choy and pork soup wontons Noodle salad with pepper and pork Vegetarian alternatives available What you will learn: The Chinese seasonings and their usage Basic knife skills How to wrap the perfect wonton Creating a stock for the soup Making the stuffing Cook the perfectly al dente noodle for the salad Stir-frying When and where: Wednesday 16 September, 11:00 – 14:00 in Marylebone Ticket price: £60 per person including lunch and Chinese tea Class information:  A small group of 6 people As hands-on (or off) as you like. You can make everything from start to finish or watch and sip tea while we show you how it is done. We aim to have plenty of leftovers for you to take home. To book, please email us for booking...
Mid-Autumn Festival: a supermoon, an immortal and lots of mooncakes!

Mid-Autumn Festival: a supermoon, an immortal and lots of mooncakes!

On the 27th September, Chinese people around the world will celebrate the Mid-Autumn Festival 中秋节 which is the second most important festival in the whole year.  It celebrates family gathering and reunion, thanksgiving for a good harvest (due to China’s agrarian roots) and affords people a celestially auspicious window to pray for material or spiritual blessings (with increasing fervency in modern times!). On the night, family members return home to have a big reunion meal. Mooncakes of various sweet and savoury fillings are given as gifts to friends and families leading up to the festival, as the round shape signifies completeness and unity in Chinese culture.  After the dinner, everyone would sit around to admire the bright moon, sip tea and enjoy the stacks of mooncake they surely would have accumulated by then. The Mid-Autumn Festival falls on the 15th day of the eighth month in the Chinese lunar calendar as the Chinese believe the moon appears the biggest on this date.  In a highly unusual culmination of events in the cosmos, there will be a supermoon and a lunar eclipse at the same time during the festival this year.  A supermoon happens when the moon reaches its peak while it is at the closest possible distance to the earth, making the moon’s diameter look up to 14 per cent bigger, according to Nasa. This September’s supermoon will also coincide with a lunar eclipse, making it a supermoon lunar eclipse – an event which has happened just five times since 1910. The last time the two events converged was in 1982 and the next time will be 2033.  However,...